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Best Coast

Nov 15, 2019

After stepping away from her childhood acting career, vocalist Bethany Cosentino began writing and experimenting with music in her teens. She joined forces with multi-instrumentalist Bobb Bruno in early 2009, and by the end of the year, the two were preparing for their official debut as Best Coast. The Los Angeles based duo has since released four full-length records and has garnered a dedicated following within the indie and surf rock scene. In this episode, we speak to Cosentino and Bruno about their unique partnership and collaborative process, Best Coast’s forthcoming record, and much more.

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Transcript

Evan Ball:
Hello, this is Evan Ball. Welcome to Striking A Chord, an Ernie Ball podcast. Today on the podcast we have a rare sit down with both Bethany Cosentino and Bobb Bruno of Best Coast. Best Coast has a new long awaited album on its way. So we'll talk about that. At least the parts that aren't still secret. We discussed Bethany and Bobb's unique musical partnership. What does the collaborative process look like? We also talked about the Best Coast success story, how bedroom songwriting and Lo-fi recordings quickly blossomed into an amazing career with many highlights. We talked about Fred Savage, or maybe it was Ben Savage, I can't remember. Anyway, before we get started, let me clarify a couple terms that get used. They reference the smell, which might sound odd until you learn that the smell is the name of a DIY punk type music venue in LA. And also Pocahaunted is the name of the band, Beth was in prior to Best Coast. So let's get started. Ladies and gentlemen, Bethany Cosentino and Bobb Bruno.

Evan Ball:
Bethany Cosentino and Bobb Bruno, welcome to the podcast,

Bethany C.:
Thank you.

Bobb Bruno:
Thanks for having us.

Evan Ball:
All right, so I follow Best Coast on Instagram. And, recently a couple days ago, actually, I notice, kind of cryptically you guys posted the date, 11 5 19. What does it mean?

Bethany C.:
Scorpio season. That's what it mean. We have a song coming out, a new song.

Evan Ball:
So, is this the first single from your new album?

Bethany C.:
We shall see.

Evan Ball:
Okay. All right. And for some context, for our listeners. We're recording this on November 1st, prior to the release of this song, you all are hearing it sometime after the release, hopefully enjoying that song. All right. So what can you tell us about this album coming up?

Bethany C.:
It took a really long time, to make.

Bobb Bruno:
It's the longest we've ever spent.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Recording anything.

Bethany C.:
I mean, we haven't put a record out in like five years, pretty much. So this is kind of like our big return to the world. Without saying too much I think this record just feels, just kind of like a newer version of us. Just like a different side of us that we haven't quite shown the world yet.

Evan Ball:
Cool.

Bethany C.:
At least that's what I think.

Evan Ball:
Well, in the interim, you guys, so 2018 you put out a kid's album. And then earlier this year, you were the house band for Fred Savage's-

Bobb Bruno:
What Just Happened.

Bethany C.:
What Just Happened.

Evan Ball:
... What Just Happened. Which I want to... I'm very curious about that. I haven't seen it. So you have been busy?

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
So when did you start writing and recording this album?

Bethany C.:
Okay, so there's a song on this record that I wrote, like almost four years ago. So we've been working on this record and songs for this record for a really long time. And it just kind of like took a while to really get the ball rolling and there was just some shit going on that we were, going through and navigating. And then, the process of getting this record together has been quite-

Evan Ball:
Because of that longer time span, does that give you more songs to choose from?

Bobb Bruno:
It did actually.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Not a ton, but, more than we had In the past.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, usually it's like, we just go into it. And we're like, "Okay, here's the record."

Evan Ball:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
But this time around, it was done a bit differently. It's very... like, the whole way we've approached this has been very different. And then of course, we did a TV show, which is different, and I feel like, we kind of took a bit of not necessarily like a hiatus because we were definitely still working and we were still playing shows and touring and doing stuff but, I think it was just kind of like, it was little bit of a shift and then the doors kind of open for us and then all these other weird opportunities started popping up like being on television.

Evan Ball:
Yeah, maybe we should talk about that now. Well, first off, was Fred Savage, a fan, when he asked you to be the house band?

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
Okay. Did you know him before that, or did he just reach up?

Bethany C.:
Well, here's a funny story. So, my dad is a musician, and my dad plays in all these different cover bands. And my dad was in a Fleetwood Mac cover band a couple years ago. And, Bobb and I were there at the show. It was at the whisky and like, I had tweeted about it, trying to like help get my dad's band some attention and get some people to come out. And at the end of the show, I like turn around and there's this guy walking towards me. And I'm like, "What the hell, that's the guy from Boy Meets World." And he's like, "Hey, I'm Ben. I'm a huge fan." And I'm like, "Yeah, I know who you are. I watched your show, as a kid." And, we ended up, hanging out with him. And then, years passed. And we were in the studio and got this email from our manager that was like, "Hey, Fred Savage has a new show. And he's interested in booking you as the late night band, or as the house band for this lady." And we were like, "Okay."

Bethany C.:
So when we went to meet Fred, we both thought it was Ben. Like, I knew that Fred was different than Ben, but I just... it just kind of blurred together.

Evan Ball:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
And when he walked into the room for the meeting, I was like, "Hi, it's nice to see you again. We met at my dad show." He's like, "We've never met." And then I was like, "Oh, fuck. It was your brother." But then it weirdly became a joke in the show.

Evan Ball:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
So it ended up... I literally turned to him. I was like, "We're not getting that gig. I fucked this up for us."

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, that was literally the first thing that happened, in the meeting, was that.

Bethany C.:
And then when we got hired, I was like, "Oh, okay, I guess they liked that I was a bit of an airhead."

Evan Ball:
So the premise of the show, it's sort of a talk show.

Bethany C.:
It's so [inaudible 00:05:44].

Evan Ball:
Based on a TV show that doesn't really exist.

Bobb Bruno:
Correct.

Evan Ball:
which is based on a series of books that doesn't really exist.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
I'm so intrigued. I haven't seen it but-

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, it's kind of similar to Talking Dead, in the premise, but, after the initial couple minutes where they show a scene from this fake show and then Fred comes on-

Evan Ball:
So they film scenes?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah yeah.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
[crosstalk 00:06:09] cliffhangers.

Evan Ball:
As if it was, from an episode?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, yeah.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
So yeah it's like this shot on film, sci-fi thing, and then Fred will come on and be like, "What just happened?" Then we're going to recap Tonight Show and, the guests are supposed to be fans of the show, that was called the Flare, the fake show, or fans of the book. But then it just kind of becomes like a comedy like talk show and doesn't dwell on the sci-fi thing.

Evan Ball:
So is it the weird concept that made you want to do it? The kind of really, venturing off into something new being the house band?

Bethany C.:
Honestly, I think it was just for us. I mean, it's a rad opportunity and a huge platform to showcase your band, being given an opportunity like that. And then also, once we met Fred and, talked to him, he's the coolest guy ever. He literally just put Bobb on an episode of Modern Family-

Evan Ball:
Really?

Bethany C.:
Which is Bobb's favorite show in the world.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, [crosstalk 00:07:04].

Evan Ball:
That's awesome.

Bethany C.:
So like, he's just cool and he champions us and he's like... I feel like we just like made a friend for life and it was just really cool and it was, really weird and just so not our lane way because it was like, literally like ours in a TV studio, doing things that we are not used to doing but it was really cool and it was fun to see ourselves on TV playing these, goofy little songs that we wrote.

Evan Ball:
Yeah. Are you writing, brand new original material just for the show?

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
We did.

Bobb Bruno:
We wrote the theme song, and then all the cues for people coming on stage and then, if that [inaudible 00:07:41], it needed music, we would do that. A lot of that.

Evan Ball:
So it's recurring beats, are you writing new stuff for every episode?

Bobb Bruno:
Usually changed-

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
... every episode.

Bethany C.:
Well, there were different jingles, and then we kind of created like an arsenal of music that we would just, pick from and then, we would be making like a set list and we had the dumbest names for songs. We'd be, We had one called, minion. And, we would just name stupid shit.

Bobb Bruno:
King Of The Hill.

Bethany C.:
And we were like, "This is so funny." Because it's like every other house band is like so pro, and we are just like, the goofiest, people just literally been like, "Okay, yeah the King of the Hill song, that comes next. Right? Okay, one, two, three, go." And, it's so weird.

Evan Ball:
Yeah, that's awesome. [inaudible 00:08:22] cool.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah we had to Nick Reinhart play with us too.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Which was-

Bethany C.:
Which saved our asses. Because he's-

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, because he actually knows what he's doing.

Bethany C.:
... very talented.

Bobb Bruno:
He's so good at guitar and composing and stuff. So, he, Beth and I would get together at my house and we would hash out, what we're going to play.

Bethany C.:
There was one night where we just wrote, until like one o'clock in the morning, and we were all delirious and had been drinking so much coffee. And then we were like, "I don't know if they're even going to like the songs." And then Fred would write back the next day, "These are great. I'm so excited." The only one that was a bit of an issue, was the theme song. It took a while to get that one.

Evan Ball:
Did any beats make it into Best Coast songs for the album?

Bethany C.:
No.

Bobb Bruno:
No. It's totally different.

Evan Ball:
They're separate. [crosstalk 00:09:02].

Bethany C.:
But I'm so curious if when we start touring again, if people will be like, "Play..." what if someone like, "Play the What Just Happened theme." Some super, hardcore fan that watch the show.

Evan Ball:
What if they only like that [crosstalk 00:09:14]-

Bethany C.:
I know.

Evan Ball:
[crosstalk 00:09:15].

Bobb Bruno:
[crosstalk 00:09:16] play the songs, yeah.

Bethany C.:
People came to see us soon as they saw us on TV.

Evan Ball:
Let's veer back the new album, producers, collaborators, [inaudible 00:09:23] can say that?

Bethany C.:
Can't really talk about, unfortunately got to wait.

Evan Ball:
I'm feeling more intrigued by the second. Are there any anxieties or worries when you're birthing a new album into the world? Do you get nervous about how it will be received?

Bobb Bruno:
Not really. As long as I feel confident in what we did, and I enjoy it, and, I'm happy and whatever happens, happens.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Well you can't think like that. Otherwise, you're just, you're in your head too much. And you start second guessing yourself. And I feel like with us, I just trust my instincts and Beth's instincts as far as, what we think is going to work for us. So, I'm confident in that. So I don't really stress about that kind of stuff.

Evan Ball:
Do you feel more confident before certain albums that have come out? Can you compare how you feel on this one, compared to other ones?

Bethany C.:
Well, I mean, I think for a perfect example is crazy for you. We had no expectations, we just made the record, in a super short period of time, we put it out, we went to South by Southwest. Next thing we knew we were a top 50 billboard charting album. We did not think about it at all. So I think it's, if I think back to that experience, I'm like, oh, yeah, I think the best results happened when we just had zero expectations and just let shit happen naturally.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
And then the second record was of course, you have all this pressure, because your first record did well, and then you're like, "Okay, hopefully this one does just as good." And, I went nuts during the process of making that record. So, he was totally fine, but I was a psychopath.

Evan Ball:
Do you sit down intentionally to write? Or, do you have songs? Is it more like you're at home with your guitar, and ideas pop up when they pop up? Do you set aside time where I'm going to write an album, or is it?

Bethany C.:
No, I work very much just, when the inspiration kind of hits me. I did for this record, try to, set time aside and, the TV show is a prime example of the idea of sitting down to work.

Evan Ball:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Bethany C.:
I feel like I can do that when there's a deadline or something has to get done. But if I'm just doing it for the sake of being creative, I find that it works better if I just kind of like, work on instinct, like, "Oh, okay, I feel like writing a song right now or I have an idea in my head." But, when I actually try to sit and make shit happen, it's too hard. And then I overthink it.

Evan Ball:
When you naturally, when you're at home. Just pick up a guitar if you're sitting on the couch?

Bethany C.:
Not me.

Evan Ball:
No? oh.

Bethany C.:
I don't-

Bobb Bruno:
I don't either.

Bethany C.:
We're like super non professional, professional musicians.

Bobb Bruno:
For me with writing it is like, "I'm going to write."

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bobb Bruno:
And, sometimes it does not work at all, and just kind of... I've gotten really good at figuring out pretty quickly like, "Oh, it's not going to happen, right now."

Evan Ball:
Do you have a special room, you go into, or a studio?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
He has a room that I refer to as the psychotic room.

Evan Ball:
Oh. It sounds inspiring.

Bethany C.:
Is that where you write? Or do you write in the living room?

Bobb Bruno:
I do both. But, a lot of this stuff I did in there.

Bethany C.:
In the psycho room?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
It's the truly-

Bobb Bruno:
It's like-

Evan Ball:
Yeah, how did it earn that nickname?

Bethany C.:
Explain.

Bobb Bruno:
It's just full of gear. Like-

Bethany C.:
You can't see the wall.

Evan Ball:
Tripping over wires and-

Bethany C.:
No.

Bobb Bruno:
No, no. It's very neat.

Bethany C.:
Super organized. He's the most organized person.

Evan Ball:
Psychotically organized.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
One wall is, shelves, just all pedals. There's like a lot of keyboards, a lot of guitars and basses. Yeah, there-

Bethany C.:
An these like posters.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, yeah.

Evan Ball:
That sounds overwhelming.

Bobb Bruno:
It's like-

Evan Ball:
[crosstalk 00:12:47] you have any tool you could ever want, once you're in there.

Bobb Bruno:
It's basically like a teenager's dream environment.

Bethany C.:
It's like Richie Rich.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, yeah. It's like, all the gear you want and then like a bunch of wrestling and music posters everywhere.

Evan Ball:
So from what I gather, Bethany will write a song basically, chords, lyrics, melody, goes to you for sort of, layering instrumentation. Is that basically that kind of a separation of duties?

Bethany C.:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
What form does that take? Is it like, Bobb do you do you receive like a logic, file or a phone recording or a musical scroll?

Bobb Bruno:
Somewhere between. It's like, just an mp3 of Beth from Garage Band, singing into... well, you haven't like a real mic.

Bethany C.:
Now I do.

Bobb Bruno:
Okay, so something kind of mixed down.

Bethany C.:
I've upped my game somewhat.

Bobb Bruno:
It's like a garage band.

Bethany C.:
And then I just give him, a crazy, rundown of my ideas. And, sometimes I'll send them YouTube links to references or I'll say, "I have an idea for this part, or could you maybe like, do some sort of bass line that might sound like this." And I'll just give him ideas. And then sometimes I'll just send it to him and be, "I trust you." I mean, that's the thing. And I feel like that's the thing that's always worked, so well with he and I is that, he understands me and he understands, I feel like when he hears the songs that I craft-

Evan Ball:
He [crosstalk 00:14:10] picture.

Bethany C.:
... he knows exactly what to put on it to make it sound like Best Coast.

Bobb Bruno:
That's great.

Bethany C.:
When you hear the songs from, the demoed version that I make to the version that ends up on record or the version that ends up release, it's just the bones of the song and then Bobb comes in and kind of like adds all the texture and the layers and then, once we get everything together then it kind of becomes, you know-

Evan Ball:
So will you add, maybe virtual drums from Garage Band?

Bethany C.:
No, no, no.

Evan Ball:
No, okay. So it's just-

Bobb Bruno:
It's our vocals.

Bethany C.:
It's like straight up, maybe like once or twice I've like done it, [inaudible 00:14:41].

Evan Ball:
Are you micing yourself on the [inaudible 00:14:42], Or you go directed with an [inaudible 00:14:45].

Bethany C.:
No, sometimes I'm like just literally doing, my little mini orange amp, plugged in and then I'm just sitting there recording into the microphone. I can barely do anything. I don't know how I've made it this far, but I have.

Evan Ball:
You guys are a great duo then.

Bethany C.:
We are like the most ridiculous people that have somehow figured out how to make this work.

Evan Ball:
So Bobb, how do you take that, and then... I mean, if you want to layer things, don't you want it in logic or pro tools, whatever you use?

Bobb Bruno:
And I don't use that stuff either. I don't use a computer at all for music.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bobb Bruno:
I'm like a caveman.

Evan Ball:
So what does your process look like once you get that recording?

Bobb Bruno:
I'll put it in a old hard disk recorder. That's like usually a track or [inaudible 00:15:28] sometimes, and a lot of times I'll just play, electronic drum kit to Beth's, song, and then-

Evan Ball:
You're like manually playing it.

Bobb Bruno:
Physically playing-

Evan Ball:
[crosstalk 00:15:41] drums.

Bobb Bruno:
I have the V-drums.

Evan Ball:
Oh you have V-drums, okay.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
Also keep in mind that I'm not giving him something with like tempo.

Evan Ball:
[crosstalk 00:15:49].

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, yeah.

Bethany C.:
He's having to like, oh, okay, she's changing here. He like straight up comes in and I'm like, all over the fucking place and this fool just like drops in and makes it work.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, and then, so I'll do, I'll play the V-drums and then add bass and my leads, or like, keyboard stuff if I hear it. Just kind of whatever I feel like the song needs and what... on occasion, I'll start the song over where I program the drums and do guitar and then, send it to Beth so she can sing, properly with it, in the tempo.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, there was a couple things for this record, where I was like, "Can you re-record this for me? Because it's so super sloppy, and it will just be easier." But I think like, we've tried. I remember when we first started this, I was like, "Do you think maybe we should just try to write together, I'll come over to your house." I think like five minutes, and we were like, This isn't how it works for us.

Bobb Bruno:
Too awkward.

Bethany C.:
Like we just have to do it the way we do it. And it works. And so there's really no sense in changing-

Evan Ball:
Interesting. So you got a good system.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
So normally you're using her original recording-

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
... to layer on top of that.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
And that suffices as a demo until you go into the studio to do the final version of it.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, it's funny to have to play those demos for producers and managers and people and be like, "Oh, yeah, you want to hear a demo here." You go, and then they're kind of like, "Okay." But I feel like it's like we've gotten this far doing it the way that we do it and I think it's just like that dumb saying, if it's not broke, don't fix it. It's just like, it works for us. And I think, it's part of the appeal of our band is that we're kind of just like, winging it a little bit, but we make it work.

Evan Ball:
When I listen to your music. Your songs are such a good reminder that critical to a good song is a good melody. So, chords and a good melody can go really far.

Bobb Bruno:
Oh, yeah.

Evan Ball:
Not that it's easy to make up a good melody either, kind of have a knack for it or you don't or you get lucky sometimes. But it's so easy to, overthink, while you're creating a song and get bogged down on stuff that's not really making it more listenable.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Definitely.

Evan Ball:
So, do you think about that when you're writing? What are the ingredients? Obviously you have a knack for creating good melodies and-

Bethany C.:
Thanks.

Evan Ball:
... so that's, you have that core and then you get to... just came to my head. You don't have to polish a turd you have like-

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, no, no, no.

Evan Ball:
... the solid.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
Yeah, like that's so central is to have chords and good melody right there.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, like when she sends me the song, it's usually like a clearly formed song. It is good on its own.

Evan Ball:
It's maybe not production quality, but I'm talking about-

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, yeah.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, definitely.

Bobb Bruno:
Composition wise. And, I think that makes it so easy for me to write to it, is like most of it... There's been very few times where I don't automatically just instinctively, know what to play. Like it's pretty, easy for me. I'll listen to the thing once or twice and then I'll get right on the drums and just kind of, knock that out first and then, do the bass line and then, figuring out the guitar melodies for me is the thing that takes the longest, sometimes.

Evan Ball:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
Well, because the other cool thing that he always does too is, he never likes... he always wants to, allow my melody and a lot of times to like my harmonies and things like that, to kind of guide the song. So he's always like... he doesn't want to make his guitar lines be... I mean, it's interesting though, because a lot of times Bobb's guitar lines do become their own melodies and they become hooks. And feeling okay, that guitar line he plays in the beginning, is as hooky as the actual hook.

Evan Ball:
Definitely, yeah.

Bethany C.:
So, that is something I really love about collaborating with him is that he gives me space to kind of like, do my vocal melodies and my harmonies and things like that. And he always says that in studio, "I don't want to impede over what she's doing vocally."

Evan Ball:
Harmonies are such a big part, to have so many of your songs. So those aren't there on the original one. So you you both sort of-

Bobb Bruno:
They are sometimes.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bethany C.:
I do those in demos. Yeah, like all layer harmonies, and then-

Evan Ball:
That makes sense.

Bethany C.:
I just kind of get to a point where I'm like, "Okay, I don't need to keep going."

Evan Ball:
I know when you're in the midst of creating an album, you're so close to the songs. You've heard him so many times. But do you have a sense of, on this new album which songs you think will be most popular? I guess you can't say song names, maybe track numbers?

Bethany C.:
No.

Evan Ball:
Do any stand out?

Bethany C.:
I feel like with this record, I'm just... I'm in a place with it, where I'm really proud of it. I really like it. And I just seem like, whatever happens with it happens. I feel like we've taken some risks. We're doing some things differently. And I think it's just, I want the best for it. But I'm also like, if it doesn't work out the way that you ultimately, hope a record does. It's kind of just like, whatever, we made something that we're really proud of, and it's just another rad thing we got to do together.

Evan Ball:
Have you filmed any videos, or do you plan to for this new album?

Bethany C.:
Check, November 5th, you'll have an answer to that.

Evan Ball:
Oh it's going to be a video.

Bobb Bruno:
Maybe, maybe it will be.

Bethany C.:
Maybe, I don't know.

Evan Ball:
The listeners already know.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, this will be after that.

Evan Ball:
But us here in the... living in the past.

Bethany C.:
Yeah there's a video, yeah, there's a video, there's a video. And then yeah, there are things happening, you will see.

Evan Ball:
All right. You heard it here first people. All right let's take a quick break, and we come back, I want to dig into the Best Coast story.

Evan Ball:
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Evan Ball:
So Bethany, I know you've been around entertainment since you were a kid. And I've read that you recorded as a teenager, songs and put them online. And according to the internet, you had a-

Bethany C.:
Can't wait for this.

Evan Ball:
... label interest early on.

Bethany C.:
Uh-huh (affirmative).

Evan Ball:
But you did not accept?

Bethany C.:
Uh-huh (affirmative).

Evan Ball:
Why not?

Bethany C.:
I think at the time I was just like, I wasn't... I don't know, like, I just wanted to, like be a wild teenager. I was like, I just want to like party and have fun and, go to shows.

Evan Ball:
Isn't that the best way to be a wild teenager, to get signed-

Bethany C.:
I guess but, it very much felt like what was going to happen to me was that they were going to take me and mold me and make me some type of artist that I didn't want to be and my whole mo, he can attest to this is, I like things done... I want. I'm a control freak. I really like to be in control and make sure that things are working a certain way and I have like visions for things that I like really want to make sure it comes together. And I just feel like I couldn't ever be one of those artists where they're like, "Okay, let's take you and have somebody else write your music for you and dress a certain way." I'm not interested in that.

Evan Ball:
Yeah, that must have been so tempting as an aspiring artist, to [inaudible 00:22:59]-

Bethany C.:
No.

Evan Ball:
No.

Bethany C.:
I think it was just like... I just felt like I was like, fuck it-

Evan Ball:
How did you know that they would, take you and, mold you, and-

Bethany C.:
I just had that feeling.

Bobb Bruno:
That's what they did back then.

Bethany C.:
Yeah. And that in what they did back then.

Bobb Bruno:
I mean the still do that now, but, especially back then.

Bethany C.:
That was like, the peak of that time.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bethany C.:
And I was like just making... I was like doing, singer songwriter stuff and I just wanted to be a girl that played, acoustic guitar and keyboard and, I didn't want somebody to come in and craft me and make me somebody and I was also, very into punk at that time. And I was like, "Oh, they're going to make me like..." It's so funny because I was, really punk. But then I was making this, super emo singer songwriter music. But I just think at the end of the day, it was like, I didn't... I wanted to just make music and do my own thing. And I'm really glad that I did because had I gone down that path, this probably wouldn't have happened. Who knows what would have happened?

Evan Ball:
Yeah, good call.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
Are those songs still up on Myspace or wherever they were?

Bethany C.:
Well, they were like, the first time I ever put them out. I think was on PureVolume. You can find them on YouTube. I was looking for something on YouTube recently and they came up and I was like, "Wow." And then in my mind I was like, "Oh, maybe that'd be cool like re-record."

Evan Ball:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
Maybe I'll just do like a solo-

Evan Ball:
Just hand them over to Bobb, seems like a [crosstalk 00:24:14].

Bethany C.:
A solo record with my own music from like... didn't Tegan and Sara just do that, they made a record.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah. High school, stuff.

Evan Ball:
Oh, really.

Bethany C.:
Music they wrote from high school. Yeah. It's funny though because that type of music is so popular now, like women doing kind of like folky singer songwriter stuff, so maybe I could just do a little-

Evan Ball:
Yeah, that'd be fun.

Bethany C.:
... side thing with Bethany Sharayah, I bring it back.

Evan Ball:
That's right. That was the name right?

Bethany C.:
Well, that is my name.

Evan Ball:
Oh that is? Okay.

Bethany C.:
It's my middle name. Yeah.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bethany C.:
It was very just like... yeah, my last name is too hard. So I'll make my middle name. That's even harder. Part of it.

Evan Ball:
So you two met, was it during in the band Pocahaunted?

Bobb Bruno:
Before though.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, we met before that. Yeah. I was like, I want to say I was like 17 when we met.

Bobb Bruno:
Probably, yeah.

Bethany C.:
And we met through, our friends that, played in a band called Mika Miko, which two of the sisters are now in a band called Bleached and we're still really good friends with them and we just kind of met through like that music scene and the smell and stuff like that. And he was just always at, the same shows and parties as me and the night we actually met was a really weird night. Where, a girl tried to jump out a window and it was, really dark and intense and heavy. Yeah.

Evan Ball:
Well I'm glad something good came out of that.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
Yeah. And we both kind of just looked at each other like, "What the fuck is happening?"

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah. Time to leave.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Is basically what we did.

Bethany C.:
And now, fast forward, many decades later, and, here we are.

Evan Ball:
So Bobb, you were recording bands back then?

Bobb Bruno:
I was recording a lot of bands in the smell scene. And-

Evan Ball:
Just in the psychotic room?

Bobb Bruno:
No, no.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bobb Bruno:
This is pre that.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bobb Bruno:
I used to have a space downtown. That was my practice space. So it was really big. So you could set up a full band and just record them live and it wasn't something... I was interested in doing that. But, it just kind of happened by accident. It was actually, Josh Klinghoffer, who plays in Red Hot Chili Peppers now, he had loaned me his cassette track. And, I'd told someone that, "Oh, I have a cassette track right now." And they're like, "Oh, will you record our band?" I was like, "Sure." And then-

Evan Ball:
Like, the porter studios?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
[crosstalk 00:26:29] cassette an their... yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah. So it was this punk band, and I recorded them. And then word just got out to other bands in the smell scene. And then I just ended up recording a lot of bands in that era, and, was recording, bands on the label that Pocahaunted was on, and then I just started recording with them too. And that's kind of how, Beth and I realized musically we're on the same page and liked a lot of the same stuff as opposed to, what that bands was. I love drone music and experimental stuff too. But we both connected over the fact that we love the Beach Boys and Fleetwood Mac and Cocteau Twins and things like that.

Evan Ball:
So Bethany, you briefly went to college in New York.

Bethany C.:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Evan Ball:
And then 2009 you came back in Beth Coast?

Bethany C.:
see. That's part of why it's named that.

Evan Ball:
Okay, I'm not the first to do that. Okay. And Best Coast is born?

Bethany C.:
Yeah. Well, basically, I was living in New York and I was going to school and I had, quit Pocahaunted. And I was just like, I don't really want to play music anymore. At least I didn't want to play that kind of music. And I was like, if I'd ever play music, again, it'll be sort of more structured, kind of like pop, rock or something. And I was, living in New York, and I just got super bummed out and I like hated the winter. And I was just like, I want to go home so badly. And I just emailed him and I was like, Hey, I'm moving back. I plan on starting a band, I'm going to write some songs can I send stuff to you? And he was like, "Yeah, for sure just, whenever you get some songs, send them my way."

Bethany C.:
And then I literally flew home. I like moved home within a weekend, and then was like living at my mom's house and just, locked myself in the back bedroom and just started writing and I wrote the first Best Coast song which is called Sun Was High and I sent it to him and I was like... and I think even the first time I put that song out it was just me. I didn't even... Then he and I re recorded it and made ended up on a seven inch but I just started sending him music and then we would get together and work on shit and record shit and then literally, it's still a thing I don't even understand.

Evan Ball:
When I look at the timeline. It sounds like you guys really hit the ground running because you come back 2009-

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
A year later you already signed with an album out.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
So, were you gigging around a lot or was it more that you're recording and floating music around town?

Bethany C.:
It just like happened. Like I went to his house. And I remember he was like, "Do you want to play shows?" And I was like, "Yeah, I guess. I guess we could play shows. But do we have to get a band?" And he's like, "No, I can program it all on a mini disc." And I was like, "Okay cool." And I was literally playing like my dad's danelectro that he gave me, that was like... we both were playing danelectros and, I had a practice amp and it was so, budget. And we were just... we knew a bunch of people in bands that were like, "Okay, you guys want to play this, DIY art space?" And we would play and then it just kind of kept happening, growing and growing and growing. And then-

Evan Ball:
But still, this is within the span of a year?

Bethany C.:
Well, did I move back in 2009 or 2008? I think I moved back-

Bobb Bruno:
Nine.

Bethany C.:
2009.

Bobb Bruno:
We talked about the band, when you're back for Christmas.

Bethany C.:
Oh. Okay.

Bobb Bruno:
We were already talking about doing the band. But, we started, pretty quickly in 2009. I mean, we were doing... Beth wrote a lot of songs and we would knock out like, three a day, at least. And we would meet, twice a week. And we did that for, probably a month. And so we had a lot of songs and-

Evan Ball:
So did you get label attention by gigging? Or was it more from your recordings?

Bethany C.:
Well, this is what happened. We would like... we've had these very... for a lack of better word Lo-fi recordings that we would do on our own, and then we became the Lo-fi band, and that became a genre and whatever. But, we would record them and then we got this random manager. I had made like a Best Coast email, which is still the email address that I use. And, this guy emailed me and he was like, "Hey, I'm an artist manager, and I'm really interested in your music and you're super talented. And can we meet." And I went in, met with him. And I told Bobb about him. I was like, "I met this guy. He wants to manage us, very cool." That he's like, "Sure, whatever, cool."

Bethany C.:
And then he hooked us up with this, ad agency that had a recording Studio and asked if we would go in and record, two songs for like a seven inch that basically this agency would distribute to their clients. And, it was the first time we ever recorded with live drums. And this was at bedrock music practice space in Silverlake or Echo Park. And then Lewis [Petkoff 00:31:22] who actually ended up producing Crazy For You and produce the Kids record with us. All of a sudden we were doing that and it wasn't until When I'm With You, came out, that's when we started getting a shit load of attention because it went on Pitchfork and Pitchfork gave us like best new music and then-

Bobb Bruno:
We made the video.

Bethany C.:
... before we knew it... yeah, we made the music video and then before we knew it, it was like, labels were flying out to our shows in Europe and to meet us and then we signed with Mexican summer and it was just like, yeah, it's a fucking blur. When I think about it, I'm like, it happened so fast and it never stopped. There was never a low where it was like, "Okay, we're not a band anymore." Even in this break that we had we were still working and still doing shit. It just never stopped.

Evan Ball:
Yeah. So we have the 09, the 2010, which happened fast and you put your first album out, crazy for you. And that gets a pretty good buzz pretty quickly too. You alluded to that earlier. How did that get into the world so effectively?

Bobb Bruno:
You got me.

Evan Ball:
Can you trace the path?

Bobb Bruno:
It was like kind of that was the dawn of music blogs, which were big thing. So, that got us a lot of exposure. And then, Pitchfork was a big deal back then. So, we got best new music for the album. But it was crazy. I remember we were coming back from Europe. And our record had just come out. And, we got like a email or something. And they're like... Oh, yeah, debuted at like, 36.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
And we're like, "What the fuck?" That's insane.

Bethany C.:
Like we were in the airport.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
And I remember, we were looking at it on my first generation iPhone. And we were like, "What?" We were one below Miley Cyrus and we-

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, is [crosstalk 00:33:05], no, it's just a regularly chart." So crazy.

Bethany C.:
... We literally started this in your bedroom-

Evan Ball:
And not that long ago.

Bethany C.:
No. Like after I dropped out of college. And like what?

Evan Ball:
So how soon was that after the release, and music like within a-

Bethany C.:
Well back then it was-

Bobb Bruno:
Like a month.

Bethany C.:
No, no. It was, pretty quick after it came out.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
We were in Europe when the record came out. And then we were flying back and I remember we were at JFK and we were sitting in the terminal waiting for our flight, I think back to LA or we might have stopped in New York to do some sort of promo or something and then, we got that screenshot email from the label and we were just like, "What the fuck?"

Evan Ball:
Wow, and so it's mostly write ups bloggers more than radio play, right? [crosstalk 00:33:48].

Bethany C.:
No, yeah, I mean, we had like, AAA, like indie.

Bobb Bruno:
We got a lot of, in like, satellite radio.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Like a lot of SiriusXM-

Bethany C.:
Sirius. Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
... stuff on the... whatever they call [inaudible 00:33:59].

Bethany C.:
Well, I also think that when we did we... we did a music video for [inaudible 00:34:06], and Drew Barrymore directed it and it was like this big video that MTV at the time was doing these, video projects where they would pair like celebrities with bands and then they would make these music videos and, Drew Barrymore was a big fan and she wanted to direct it and she wrote this kind of like Romeo and Juliet treatment, that had Chloe, Grace Mouret in it and, Donald Glover who went on to become Childish Gambino. Stars that were like not... oh, and Charlene Woodley, people that went on to be super fucking famous.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
And when that came out it like... that I think really exploded us. We won like an MTV you woody award that was presented to us by Pauly D from Jersey Shore, our lives just literally, became... It was nuts and we would look at each other the whole time and just say, "What the... What?" We also like at the time were just, I feel like there were a lot of, like Haley from paramour was champion... Okay, supporting, I can't say that word correctly. She was talking about us. And there were just a lot of people sort of spreading the word about us. And, I feel like we were just in the right place at the right time and just shit started popping off.

Bobb Bruno:
And we made a good record.

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
Of course.

Bethany C.:
And we made a great record. And we're like a funny, weird, there's no other duo like he and I out there. So it's like, you kind of see us and you're like, "Wow, I'm intrigued. What is this?"

Evan Ball:
What do you think accounts for your success? I mean, is it... I mean, I know but, what do you think?

Bethany C.:
I don't know. I think we've always just been... We're just real. We aren't interested in, being... It's the same reason I didn't sign to a major label at 16. I'm not interested in being some manufactured bullshit version of a person that I know I'm not and putting music out that I don't like 100% back. And I think we've just always, remained true to who we are. And with each record and each sort of transformation we go through, we step it up another way, and we take risks, and we do things a little bit differently. But like, at the core of it all, it's always Bobb and Beth just being Bobb and Beth.

Evan Ball:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
And I think like, we also, have a sound and people a lot of times want to say like, "Well, their music sounds the same." It's like, that's what good bands do, they create a sound. You listen to the Beatles, and you're like, "Yeah, that sounds like a fucking Beatle song." You know, it's like, I'm not... Please don't anyone think I'm trying to say we are the Beatles because I don't think that but we are who we are. And we stick to that and I think people respect and appreciate the fact that, we're just like real people doing our thing.

Evan Ball:
With good melodies, the beats.

Bethany C.:
Thanks.

Evan Ball:
Good guitar overdubs.

Bobb Bruno:
That's right.

Evan Ball:
What do you guys like to do when you're not playing music?

Bobb Bruno:
I like to cook.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, Bobb is [crosstalk 00:36:55].

Bobb Bruno:
That's like my number one hobby.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bethany C.:
Bobb is a cooker.

Bobb Bruno:
And then just like, I don't know, buy gear or... I buy a lot of DVDs. And probably the only one that... I'm really into movies so, I buy a lot of that stuff and records and-

Evan Ball:
Do you have a giant DVD collections?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
Record collection?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, his house is.

Bobb Bruno:
My house is like, I don't know, like a thrift store basically.

Bethany C.:
But it's very organized.

Bobb Bruno:
My friend one's called and she's like, "You're the most organized hoarder. I've ever seen."

Bethany C.:
Yeah, I back that.

Evan Ball:
I can't even argue that.

Bethany C.:
It's true.

Evan Ball:
That's impressive. How'd you get into cooking?

Bobb Bruno:
Because I like eating.

Evan Ball:
Just like [crosstalk 00:37:34]. Do you cook like every night? Is dinner an ordeal?

Bobb Bruno:
What I'll do is I'll prep, I'll pick one day out of the week, and I'll prep for a week and a half's worth of food and just make a lot of things. Like, it's just like four or five dishes and then I'll just rotate them throughout the week.

Bethany C.:
I cook too, but not in that way.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, I cook like I'm feeding a family of four.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, I just am like, "Oh, what am I going to make for dinner tonight? Okay, I think I'll make this." And then I make it and then the next day I do the same thing.

Evan Ball:
So you haven't joined forces in the kitchen yet?

Bethany C.:
No.

Evan Ball:
No. Okay.

Bethany C.:
But I feel like, he like will recommend products to me and be like, "I found this thing I think you'd be into it." And same for me or like, a restaurant he thinks... I like really basic, kind of healthy stuff. So he'll just kind of be like, "Oh, I saw this spot that has like good bowls. I think he'd be into it." And I'm like, "Thanks, Bobb." It's funny too, because, we don't hang out really unless we're doing music and-

Evan Ball:
Podcast.

Bethany C.:
Work stuff.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah. [crosstalk 00:38:35] podcast.

Bethany C.:
So I think a lot of times to, one of us will be out and someone will be like, "Where's Bobb? Where's Bethany?" It's like, I don't know, at her house at his house, doing I don't know.

Bobb Bruno:
But we text all the time.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, we keep in touch. It's just like, when you're touring. You live with a person. I never understand like band mates that live together.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, thought you get back from tour. Yeah, they'll together or they'll just going out together every night. It's like-

Bethany C.:
Yeah, I'm like you're going to kill each other if you do that.

Evan Ball:
Any tours planned right now?

Bethany C.:
Oh, well, this comes out after, Tuesday, right?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, we have a tour.

Evan Ball:
You heard it here first.

Bethany C.:
It's our first headline US tour in like five years. So, you better buy those tickets. Because it's a big deal.

Evan Ball:
Where does it kick off?

Bethany C.:
Here actually in LA and then, we also... like our crazy few turns 10 in 2020. So we're, hopefully going to plan some kind of cool anniversary thing for that too. So-

Evan Ball:
If you could resurrect any musician from the past to collaborate with who would it be?

Bobb Bruno:
Richard swift for me.

Bethany C.:
Glenn Frey.

Evan Ball:
Right. We smash those two together.

Bethany C.:
Jane Morrison.

Evan Ball:
Jane Morrison.

Bethany C.:
No, I'm kidding. I hate the doors.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bobb Bruno:
Although you did hear a song recently, that you, enjoyed.

Bethany C.:
Yeah, it's true.

Evan Ball:
So I take it, Bobb likes the doors?

Bobb Bruno:
I don't mind them. I have to be in the mood for it. It's not-

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bethany C.:
I did see a doors cover band though in Lake Arrowhead and I was kind of into it.

Evan Ball:
Kind of started to win you over?

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
The only time I'd not into the doors is at a bar, because someone always puts on La women or Riders on the storm and both of those are just, bar vibe killers. Especially in Los Angeles.

Evan Ball:
All right, so I hear you guys play Ernie Ball strings.

Bobb Bruno:
We do.

Bethany C.:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Evan Ball:
Which ones do you play?

Bobb Bruno:
Paradigm.

Evan Ball:
Paradigms. Okay, so you can-

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, the orange ones.

Evan Ball:
Can you top heavy bottom?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, I [inaudible 00:40:31] like color.

Evan Ball:
The 10 to 52.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah. And then I use the baritone strings for my baritone guitars, which are the purple ones.

Bethany C.:
He sets up my guitar for me, so I'll let him answer, the question.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bobb Bruno:
So, Beth, it goes like either M steels just the regular or, we've used paradigms, lately too.

Evan Ball:
What instruments are you playing on the new album?

Bobb Bruno:
Just the usual, bass and guitar, a little bit of synth.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
I play-

Evan Ball:
You do all the bass?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
I played wind chime on the record.

Evan Ball:
That sounds new.

Bobb Bruno:
Bongos.

Bethany C.:
Bongos. It's all I'm going to say.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
Would it be possible to name three albums that are most influential? Or however many you want?

Bobb Bruno:
I mean, pick a Fleetwood Mac record.

Bethany C.:
Yeah. Well, my favorite Fleetwood Mac record is Tango In The Night. I love that record, so much. I just think every song on that record is incredible. Mirage is another one of my favorite Fleetwood Mac records. I think the record that really, brought us together and kind of like influenced this band in the beginning and obviously it's transformed a bit since then is Pet Sounds by the Beach Boys.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
We wouldn't have even made this band if a record like that hadn't been made. And, that was really the record that we bonded on so heavily when we first were collaborating in Pocahaunted together. Because the people that we were working with were like, hated the Beatles and didn't like the Beach Boys and we were like, "What the fuck-

Bobb Bruno:
[crosstalk 00:42:06].

Bethany C.:
... is wrong with you? This is like classic pop music."

Evan Ball:
How about Weezer?

Bethany C.:
We were just listening. The Weezer's came on when we're driving over here.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
Was it Keep Fishin'?

Bobb Bruno:
Keep Fishin' yeah.

Bethany C.:
Weezer was one of my favorite bands in middle school and growing up.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bethany C.:
When I first learned how to play guitar, my guitar teacher would just have me come and bring songs that I liked and then he would just teach them to me and Keep Fishin' was one that I learned off the Green album and then, say it ain't so and then, that was one of the craziest most surreal things I think in Best Coast history was, when I got the email like, "Hey, Rivers Cuomo is a fan he wants to write with you. And I was like, "What? Okay." And then I like went and wrote this song with him and then it came out years later and then I was like, performing with them, getting up on stage at these huge festivals and singing it with them. And I was just like, "What is my Life?"

Evan Ball:
That's awesome.

Bethany C.:
I'm a semi Weezer collaborator like-

Evan Ball:
But I could see it though , I could see how he would be drawn to your music and vice versa.

Bethany C.:
Thanks. Thank you.

Evan Ball:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
Blink 182 too, is another one that I like. Feel like is part of the reason why I like even started playing guitar.

Evan Ball:
Oh really?

Bethany C.:
Yeah. And again, like Mark Hoppus is a huge fan of ours and we've opened for them. Fleetwood Mac is like literally the only band that I feel like we haven't gotten close to in terms of like things that we've gotten to do where we've looked at each other and been like what the fuck? Because like we've played with Brian Wilson. We've played these, crazy festivals with bands that we love and done things. Met people and Fleetwood Mac is I think the only one we haven't reached yet, but never say never.

Evan Ball:
So I assume the Best Coast is the West Coast?

Bethany C.:
Yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Evan Ball:
It is. Okay. Do you ever get any pushback from East coasters that feel like they're not allowed to like you because they'd be betraying their coast?

Bethany C.:
No.

Bobb Bruno:
Early on, because I was our merge person.

Bethany C.:
Oh, really?

Bobb Bruno:
I would get a little bit. It'd usually some meathead, dude. Who's like, "What's wrong with the East Coast?" Or, is like [crosstalk 00:44:11]-

Evan Ball:
Tim, do you feel that way at all?

Speaker 5:
[crosstalk 00:44:12] looking at me.

Bobb Bruno:
But I would just say it's like, that's just how we feel about where we're from. We're not saying there's anything wrong with the East Coast. It's just, to us. That's where we grew up.

Evan Ball:
Sure.

Bethany C.:
It's also just like, let's be honest, it's a really good band name. And it's like, my initials, B.C. he calls me B.C., you accidentally said Beth coast?

Evan Ball:
Yeah.

Bethany C.:
Like it works for us, and there's a feel to our music that feels very like West Coast and California and sunny poppy, that whole thing. So I think just as a whole package like it works. But I will say like, I feel like our shows in New York, you wouldn't know that we're like a band that's called, like this thing that's alluding to being like, "Oh, we're better than you." But I think it's also, we don't act like we're better than anybody.

Bobb Bruno:
Sure.

Evan Ball:
Yeah. All right, Bethany and Bobb, thanks for being on the podcast.

Bobb Bruno:
Thanks for having us.

Bethany C.:
Thank you.

Evan Ball:
Thanks for tuning in to Striking A Chord. And thanks to Bethany and Bobb for being on the podcast. We're looking forward to the new album. And if you're into hamburgers, you might want to stay tuned. Just a few more seconds.

Evan Ball:
Any good burgers lately Bobb?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

Speaker 5:
Just name some, top five best burger places.

Bethany C.:
Oh.

Bobb Bruno:
Oh. Wow, okay.

Bethany C.:
This is... now you're really talking his language.

Bobb Bruno:
Okay I can't say a number one but I'll... top fives just in any order. I love oyster, Grill'em All, Tommy's, Pie and Burger, and... Was a really good burger at Disney... California Adventure in Disneyland.

Evan Ball:
Really?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah. Comes with malt fries, which I love malt vinegar. So-

Bethany C.:
With the fries or like, malt, vinegar?

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah, like malt vinegar dusted.

Bethany C.:
Oh, that sounds good.

Evan Ball:
Do you know what the name of the restaurant is there?

Bobb Bruno:
Lamplighter.

Evan Ball:
Okay.

Bobb Bruno:
It used to be Ariel's grotto. It's on the fake pier area. But it's really good. All the food there is amazing.

Evan Ball:
Do you have a food blog?

Bobb Bruno:
No. My Instagram, kind of [crosstalk 00:46:32]-

Bethany C.:
His Instagram is basically a food blog, yeah.

Bobb Bruno:
Yeah.

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